American Academy of Arts and Letters, Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Foundation Award

For that work of fiction published during the preceding twelve months, which, although not a commercial success, is a considerable literary achievement.

Winner1968 winner: A Garden of Earthly Delights


American Theatre Critics Association, New Play Award

For a play which premiered outside New York City.

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist1994 nomination: The Perfectionist


Prix Bel Ami

WinnerJeunesse, 2010 winnerAfter the Wreck, I Picked Myself Up, Spread My Wings, and Flew Away


Boston Book Review, Fisk Fiction Prize

Winner1996, winner: Zombie


Bram Stoker Awards WinterBram Stoker Award

Each year, the Horror Writer’s Association presents the Bram Stoker Awards for Superior Achievement, named in honor of Bram Stoker, author of the seminal horror work, Dracula. Any work of Horror first published in the English language may be considered for an award during the year of its publication. Lifetime Achievement Awards are occasionally presented to individuals whose entire body of work has substantially influenced Horror.

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalistSuperior Achievement in Short Fiction, 2016 nomination: “The Crawl Space”

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalistSuperior Achievement in a Fiction Collection, 2016 nomination: The Doll-Master and Other Tales of Terror

WinnerSuperior Achievement in a Fiction Collection, 2012 winner: Black Dahlia and White Rose

WinnerSuperior Achievement in a Fiction Collection, 2011 winner: The Corn Maiden and Other Nightmares

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalistSuperior Achievement in Short Fiction, 2003 nomination: “The Haunting”

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalistSuperior Achievement in Long Fiction, 2000 nomination: “In Shock”

WinnerSuperior Achievement in a Novel, 1996 winner: Zombie

WinnerLifetime Achievement, 1994 winner 


Lucien Barrière Literary Award

Deauville American Film Festival

Winner2010 winnerBlonde


mwaEdgar Allan Poe Award

Honoring the best in mystery fiction, non-fiction and television. Presented by the Mystery Writers of America.

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalistBest Short Story, 2017 nomination: “The Crawl Space”

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalistBest Short Story, 2003 nomination: “Angel of Wrath”

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalistBest Short Story, 1974 nomination: “Do With Me What You Will”


Prix Femina

WinnerRoman Étranger, 2005 winnerThe Falls


Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award

This prestigious international short story award in the memory of Frank O’Connor is the single biggest prize in the world for a collection of short stories. It is hoped the Award, for a complete collection of previously unpublished stories in a book collection, will play a significant role in establishing parity of esteem for the short story collection alongside the novel.

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2013 Shortlist: Black Dahlia & White Rose


Heidemann Award for One-Act Plays

Winner1990 Co-winner: “Tone Clusters”


International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2011 Shortlist: Little Bird of Heaven

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2009 Longlist: The Gravedigger’s Daughter

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2007 Longlist: Missing Mom

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2006 Longlist: The Falls

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2004 Longlist: I’ll Take You There

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2003 Longlist: Middle Age

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2002 Longlist: Blonde

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2000 Longlist: My Heart Laid Bare

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist1998 Longlist: We Were the Mulvaneys

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist1996 Longlist: Foxfire: Confessions of a Girl Gang


International Thriller Writers Thriller Awards

Winner2016 ITW Thriller Award, Best Short Story: “Gun Accident: An Investigation”


James Tait Black Memorial Prize

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2005 Fiction shortlist: Mother, Missing


Los Angeles Times Book Prize

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist1992 Young Adult Fiction finalist: Big Mouth & Ugly Girl

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist1987 Fiction finalist: You Must Remember This

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist1980 Fiction finalist: Bellefleur


Grand prix de l’héroïne Madame Figaro

Winner2011, roman étranger, winnerMy Sister, My Love


Mademoiselle College Fiction Contest

Winner1959, winner: “In the Old World”


Magill’s Literary Annual

Each year, Magill’s Literary Annual critically evaluates major examples of serious literature published in the United States during the previous calendar year. The philosophy behind our selection process is to cover works that are likely to be of interest to general readers, that are written by authors being taught in literature programs, and that will stand the test of time.

Winner2015: Lovely, Dark, Deep

Winner2014: Evil Eye

Winner2012: A Widow’s Story

Winner2009: My Sister, My Love

Winner2008: The Gravedigger’s Daughter

Winner2008: The Museum of Dr. Moses: Tales of Mystery and Suspense

Winner2005: The Falls

Winner2004: The Tattooed Girl

Winner2004: The Faith of A Writer

Winner2002: Faithless: Tales of Transgression

Winner2001: Blonde

Winner2000: Broke Heart Blues

Winner1999: My Heart Laid Bare

Winner1995: What I Lived For

Winner1994: Foxfire: Confessions of a Girl Gang

Winner1993: Black Water

Winner1992: Heat and Other Stories

Winner1991: Because It Is Bitter, And Because It Is My Heart

Winner1990: American Appetites

Winner1988: You Must Remember This

Winner1985: Mysteries of Winterthurn

Winner1985: Last Days: Stories

Winner1984: The Profane Art: Essays and Reviews

Winner1983: A Bloodsmoor Romance

Winner1982: Angel of Light

Winner1981: Bellefleur

Winner1979: Son of the Morning

Winner1985: Night-Side: Eighteen Tales

Winner1977: Childwold

Winner1976: The Assassins

Winner1975: The Goddess and Other Women

Winner1974: Do With Me What You Will

Winner1973: Marriages and Infidelities

Winner1972: Wonderland

Winner1971: The Wheel of Love and Other Stories

Winner1971: Love and Its Derangements: Poems

Winner1970: them

Winner1970: Anonymous Sins and Other Poems

Winner1969: Expensive People

Winner1968: A Garden of Earthly Delights

Winner1967: Upon the Sweeping Flood and Other Stories

Winner1965: With Shuddering Fall

Winner1964: By the North Gate


Mystery Readers International Macavity Awards

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2008 finalist: Sue Feder Memorial, Best Historical Mystery: The Gravedigger’s Daughter


national book award winnerNational Book Award

Recognizes the most distinguished books of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry of the previous year.

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2001 finalist: Blonde

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist1990 finalist: Because It Is Bitter, And Because It Is My Heart

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist1971 finalist: Wonderland

Winner1970 winnerthem
(JCO’s Acceptance Speech)

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist1969 finalist: Expensive People

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist1968 finalist: A Garden of Earthly Delights


National Book Critics Circle Award

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2007 fiction finalist: The Gravedigger’s Daughter

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2007 autobiography finalist: The Journal of Joyce Carol Oates: 1973-1982

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist1992 fiction finalist: Black Water


National Magazine Awards

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2007 nominee: Fiction, Playboy (May 2006), “Suicide Watch”

Winner2006 winner: Fiction, The Virginia Quarterly Review (Fall), “Smother”

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2006 finalist: Fiction, The Virginia Quarterly Review (Winter), “So Help Me God”

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2006 finalist: Fiction, Zoetrope: All-Story, “High Lonesome”

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2003 finalist: Fiction, The Georgia Review, “Three Girls”

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2002 finalist: Fiction, Harper’s Magazine, “Curly Red”

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist1993 finalist: Fiction, Playboy, “The Premonition”

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist1985 finalist: Fiction, Esquire, “Raven’s Wing”

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist1983 finalist: Fiction, Esquire, “Ich Bin Ein Berliner”

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist1978 finalist: Fiction, Mademoiselle, “The Tattoo”


New York Times Notable Books of the Year

Winner2013: The Accursed

Winner2010: Sourland 

Winner2006: High Lonesome

Winner2005: Missing Mom

Winner2004: The Falls

Winner2002: I’ll Take You There

Winner2001: Faithless: Tales of Transgression

Winner2000: Blonde

Winner1998: My Heart Laid Bare

Winner1997: Man Crazy

Winner1996: We Were The Mulvaneys

Winner1995: Zombie

Winner1994: What I Lived For

Winner1993: Foxfire: Confessions of a Girl Gang

Winner1992: Black Water

Winner1991: Heat; and The Rise of Life on Earth

Winner1990: Because It Is Bitter And Because It Is My Heart

Winner1989: American Appetites

Winner1988: The Assignation

Winner1987: On Boxing; and You Must Remember This

Winner1986: Raven’s Wing

Winner1985: Solstice

Winner1984: Last Days; and Mysteries of Winterthurn

Winner1982: A Bloodsmoor Romance

Winner1981: Angel of Light

Winner1980: Bellefleur

Winner1978: Son of the Morning

Winner1977: Night Side

Winner1976: Childwold

Winner1975: The Poisoned Kiss; and The Seduction

Winner1974: The Goddess

Winner1973: Do With Me What You Will

Winner1972: Marriages and Infidelities

Winner1970: The Wheel of Love

Winner1969: them

Winner1968: Expensive People

Winner1963: By the North Gate


Oprah’s Book Club

Winner2001 selection: We Were the Mulvaneys


Orange Broadband Prize for Fiction

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2006 longlist: Rape: A Love Story

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2005 longlist: The Falls

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2002 longlist: Middle Age


PEN / Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay

The PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay aims to preserve the dignity and esteem that the essay form imparts to literature. The winner receives a  $10,000 prize and will be honored at the PEN America Literary Awards Ceremony.

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2017 longlist: Soul at the White Heat


PEN / Faulkner Award

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist1995 finalist: What I Lived For


Playboy Editorial Award

Winner1971, short story: “Saul Bird Says: Relate! Communicate! Liberate!”


Pulitzer Prize

For distinguished fiction published in book form during the year by an American author, preferably dealing with American life.

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2015 finalist: Lovely, Dark, Deep: Stories
“A rich collection of stories told from many rungs of the social ladder and distinguished by their intelligence, language and technique.”

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2001 finalist: Blonde
“‘Blonde’ is audacious, excessive, unstintingly serious and even severe in what its intellectual and narrative curiosity force upon the reader. Risking self-defeat, this ‘radically distilled’ life of Marilyn Monroe seeks to deliver a grander vision of what is right and wrong in human conduct and motive. In its variety of fictive effects and narrative voices, its muscularity (a willingness to forego finesse and delicacy when large strokes and brazenness are called for), ‘Blonde’ renders history all but irrelevant in the face of the novel’s outlandish authority. Marilyn Monroe, the actress, is simply (though not merely) the impetus for ‘Blonde.’ And if Oates’s novel eventually sheds light on Monroe’s life, it does so not as a subtext to history, but because of its warrant as a galvanizing act of imagination. ‘Blonde’ deepens our sympathies for ourselves (at a cost), it sharpens our distaste for venality, it broadens our view of what’s relevant to moral judgement, and it snares us with our own indecencies.” —Pulitzer Prize Jury

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist1995 finalist: What I Lived For
“Epic in its sweeping portrayal of the landscape of modern American culture, yet surgically precise in evoking the soul of her male protagonist, “Corky” Corcoran, Joyce Carol Oates’ 24th novel, What I Lived For, is a late 20th century masterpiece—a sprawling, encyclopedic and deeply moving story of business, politics, sex, science, and morality in the ’90s. With this ambitious novel Oates demonstrates, more powerfully than ever before, that even if our libraries ceased to exist future historians would be able to reconstruct the minutiae and meaning of our life and times from her expansive body of work.” —Pulitzer Prize Jury

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist 1993 finalist: Black Water
“In ‘Black Water,’ Joyce Carol Oates accomplishes the difficult task of turning a recent tragedy in American history—one clouded by mystery—into drama that suggests the passions, fears, and moment-by-moment decisions that produced it. Clearly, this is her boldest novel, not because her characters will be compared to Senator Kennedy and Mary Jo Kopechne, but rather because she has given a compelling voice to the woman who is the victim in her story, and by doing so enriches—and puts a human face on—someone marginalized in our cultural imagination. Elegantly written and haunting, ‘Black Water’ is that rarest of novels: a fiction that goes beneath the historical record and newspaper headlines to unearth the truth of the human heart.” —Pulitzer Prize Jury

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist1971 finalist: The Wheel of Love
“Last year’s National Book Award winner ( THEM ) plumbs ‘ordinariness’ to deep roots, feels connections that have emotional value for the here-and-now by means of the sort of sensibility which only the finest writers possess.” —Pulitzer Prize Jury

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist1970 finalist (and unanimous jury recommendation): them
“Equally assured [as Jean Stafford] but more venturesome in scope and sweep is Joyce Carol Oates, a young writer whose novel ‘Them,’ pleased us all. The latest in a series of distinctively American stories, it follows the fortunes of a blue-collar Midwestern family from the Depression to the Detroit riots, using a variety of styles which oscillate between naturalism and nightmare. As one juror pointed out, it possesses the attributes we as a people prize highly — vigor, vitality, drive. Where so many of the younger novelists feel their way and falter, Miss Oates plows ahead, affirming where others merely muse. She is aware that society is racked by problems and faces them boldly. In the words of one juror, ‘Them’ is a combination of American dream and American nightmare. ‘Miss Oates has Dreiser’s understanding of our society and much of his strength but she writes better.'”

“For its insights, its characterization, its sense of time and place, and its vivid picture of that segment of American society which lives between violence and despair, ‘Them’ seems to us the best novel of 1969.”

“We therefore recommend that the 1970 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction be awarded to Joyce Carol Oates for ‘Them,’ with Jean Stafford’s ‘Collected Stories’ as first runner-up and John Cheever’s ‘Bullet Park’ as second runner-up.” —Pulitzer Prize Jury


Scholastic Writing Award

Winner1956 winner:  “A Dawn You’ll Never See


shirley jackson awardsShirley Jackson Awards

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2011 Single-Author Collection finalist: The Corn Maiden and Other Nightmares

Winner2010 Board of Directors Special Award: Shirley Jackson: Novels and Stories

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist2008 Collection Finalist: Wild Nights!


World Fantasy Awards

Winner2011 Short Story winner: “Fossil-Figures”

Nomination, long-list, short-list finalist1995 Collection finalist: Haunted: Tales of the Grotesque


Full Lists of Awards & Honors:

Legend:
Nomination, long-list, short-list finalistnomination, longlist, shortlist, finalist
Winnerwinner


Randy Souther

I'm a Reference Librarian at the University of San Francisco's Gleeson Library, and I run the Joyce Carol Oates web site, Celestial Timepiece.

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